Cobbs Legion Hunt Club 770-577-6030 or 404-406-7501  White, Ga.
 


White Ga. 770-577-6030
 

Steves Page


 Steve's Thoughts, Idea's and Ramblings

June 6th 2013
New thoughts

We didn't take many deer last season BUT most were talking about the number of young deer they saw. We have some fawns on the ground and the trapped coyote count is over 200, the number of deer sightings and the great turkey season we had proves trapping yotes works for us. I did get a bit of news about the other clubs around us, their harvest last season was almost identical to ours, I still think we are about two years ahead by bringing in the trapper much earlier than the rest.

We had the best turkey season we've had in five years. The rain as kicked the clover  plots into overdrive, they're doing exceptionally well and I'm keeping them fertilized and cut.

The pics we're getting are encouraging, many young bucks and some not so young, I saw one buck that will be a whopper this year


Member Fee Reminder

To all members who are late with their member fee balance. Please be aware that our lease payment comes due in full Sept. 1st 2013. It is important that all members pay off any balance owed ASAP.

Thank you Steve

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Old Thoughts

March 1st 2011.

  We took our first ever 200 Lb buck in 2010, its the one Benny has in the pics section from last season. While I wasn't the guy that got it, that was a personal victory for me. We proved we can grow 200 lb deer. This was always my long term goal for the club. I was told way back when, "It was impossible where we are." Well this is more proof the QDM program works. Let um live a few years and feed them well and they WILL grow!

The coyote trap count is 200+ and continues to climb, the pro trapper is back to work. He's taken nine off the lease in the last two weeks. I've been more or less scouting for him and its harder and harder to find any sign or tracks of them anywhere on the club. When I do find sign, it looks like a pack trying to find a new home so the fawn crop should be close to normal for us this year. I thought all of you should know about it.

Most of the plots are OK, all need a good dose of fertilizer. A few have to be plowed under and redone this year. One other thing, I mailed out the invitations a few weeks ago, if any members didn't get his, please call me, most the time its an address change and I don't have the right mailing. Thanks again, Steve!

There will be a rules change about gut piles.  I've always field dressed my deer where they fell and told you guys its ok to do that , the new policy is "don't feed the coyotes", I'm going to have a gut pile dumping hole put in for us, somewhere between the two camps. Enough about yotes.

Just some random thoughts about you, me and the club:  I hope every member would at least visit QDMA's web site and see what its all about; its where most my ideas come from. You can also download and read the QDMA 2013 Whitetail Report.

I wish when members were walking the plots they'd take a long handled screwdriver with them and dig out and throw rocks out of all the plots. When I'm on the tractor sometimes it feels like there's more rocks in some of them than dirt.

One other thing and I'll quit til later; most all of us make some type lick or hang a feeder for the deer, comeheredeer, deer-cain, salt, black magic, etc. Just something to think about; I'd never ask anyone or expect anyone to spend money they didn't want to. Puretia makes a deer chow for feeders and Whitetail Institute has a product called 30-06 worth looking at for making a lick.  A look at our plots and the increase in our deer's size will tell you they make good deer products, like I said, these are just my thoughts, not asking or  suggesting anything to you.


Thanks,  Steve


Oh, and if you should see a coyote this season

         SHOOT THAT THANG!!
 
 

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NOTE: Please Don't forget to mark your stand. And just as important Don't forget to remove your pin when your safely out of your stand.
3-4 times over the years I got a call from a distressed wife about her husband not getting home when he said he would, I need to have a place to start looking, and when the pegboard has many leftover pegs from members that didn't bother to remover there peg I waist valuable time. 
 
PLEASE REMOVE YOUR PEGS WHEN YOU FINISH HUNTING

It could mean life or death for a fellow member.

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What members should do if they find a poachers vehicle? 

A poacher is nothing but a thief and stealing from everyone of us, if we don't control it we will create larger problems in the future for us all.
If you see a vehicle without a decal, or club letter from Steve on the dash. Call it in, the steps are both simple and safe. 

First take a photo of the vehicle, make sure to get the tag #. 
Then call 1 800-241-4113
Turn in a poacher

The operator will take the info. and give you instructions, if the DNR is busy and it'll be hours before they can arrive, then call 911 for Cherokee County and tell the operator its a Non-emergency call and a deputy is needed at the site to record the incident. Once that happens I can take the tag number to the court house and file trespass charges.
I certainly don't want anyone to get into an altercation with anyone, However, we learned from past experience, once the word spreads we WILL prosecute in court the problems go away.
When calling Turn in a poacher, If your TIP leads to an arrest, arrangements will be made for you to receive reward money even if you wish to remain anonymous.

  
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"Hunters Change through the years"
  Factors used to determine “successful hunting” change as well for each hunter. A hunter’s age, role models, and his years of hunting experience affect his ideas of “success.” Many hunters may fit into one of the following five groups. In 1975-1980, groups of over 1,000 hunters in Wisconsin were studied, surveyed, and written about by Professors Robert Jackson and Robert Norton, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. The results of their studies form a widely accepted theory of hunter behavior and development. Where are you now? Where would you like to be?

"Shooters Stage"
The hunter talks about satisfaction with hunting being closely tied to being able to “get shooting.”  The beginning deer hunter will talk about the number of shooting opportunities. Missing game means little to hunters in this phase. A beginning hunter wants to pull the trigger and test the capability of his firearm. A hunter in this stage may be a dangerous hunting partner.


"Limiting Out Stage"

A hunter still talks about satisfaction gained from shooting. But what seems more important is measuring success through the killing of game and the number of birds or animals shot. Limiting out, or filling a tag, is the absolute measure. Do not let your desire to limit out be stronger than the need for safe behavior at all times.



"Method Stage"
This hunter has all the special equipment. Hunting has become one of the most important things in his life. Satisfaction comes from the method that enables the hunter to take game. Taking game is important, but second to how it is taken A deer hunter will go one on one with a white-tailed deer, studying sign, tracking, and the life habits of the deer. Often, the hunter will handicap himself by hunting only with black powder firearms or bow and arrow. Bagging game, or limiting, still is understood as being a necessary part of the hunt during this phase.


"Sportsman's Stage"
As a hunter ages and after many years of hunting, he “mellows out.” Satisfaction now can be found in the total hunting experience. Being in the field, enjoying the company of friends and family, and seeing nature outweigh the need for taking game. Not all hunters go through all the stages, or go through them in that particular order. It is also possible for hunters who pursue several species of game to be in different stages with regard to each species. Some hunters feel that role models of good sportsmen, training, or reading books or magazines helped them pass more quickly through some stages.




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